Blog

  • Tactic of Arresting RNC Journalists Still Questioned After Charges Dropped

    September 23, 2008

    Journalists arrested during the Republican National Convention breathed a sigh of relief last Friday – local authorities in St. Paul announced they would not prosecute them.

    The announcement comes as welcome news for journalists, media organizations and citizens who launched a national public outcry to drop the charges against the arrested journalists. But many questions still remain about what appeared to be a planned attack against journalists and free speech during the RNC.

  • St. Paul in the Hot Seat over Journalist Arrests

    September 8, 2008

    Journalists and St. Paul citizens assembled outside St. Paul City Hall Friday to deliver more than 60,000 letters to Mayor Chris Coleman and prosecuting attorneys demanding that they immediately drop charges against all journalists arrested this week as they covered the Republican National Convention.

  • Delivery of 60,000 Letters Demanding St. Paul Drop Charges Against Journalists

    September 5, 2008

    Police have been rounding up, detaining and arresting journalists throughout the week at the Republican National Convention. But tens of thousands of people across the nation have responded with demands to protect free speech.

  • St. Paul Mayor and Media Mum on Journalism Crackdown

    September 5, 2008

    In St. Paul this week, a new generation of media makers is under assault by the city’s mayor and law enforcement officers.

    These local officials think freedom of the press extends only to their allies in mainstream media.For the rest of us, practicing journalism is a crime.

  • Taking it Home

    June 8, 2008

    Phew! It's been a stellar weekend. But don't pack your bags quite yet. Sunday is as rollicking as the last two days, if only a bit shorter. These sessions, from 9:30 to 11 a.m., should not be missed.

  • America's Internet Future Looking Like Its Past

    March 21, 2008

    With news that AT&T and Verizon have just won the most significant chunks of available wireless spectrum, Americans face a future of more of the same: slower Internet speeds for prices that are far higher than what many people pay in Europe and Asia.

  • Comcast Blocking: First the Internet -- Now the Public

    February 25, 2008
    There was huge turnout at today's public hearing in Boston on the future of the Internet. Hundreds of concerned citizens arrived to speak out on the importance of an open Internet. Many took the day off from work  standing outside in the Boston cold  to see the FCC Commissioners. But when they reach the door, they're told they couldn't come in.
     
    The size of the crowd is evidence that many Americans don't want giant corporations like Comcast and Verzion to decide what we can do and where we can go on the Internet.
     

Pages

People + Policy

= Positive Change for the Public Good

people + policy = Positive Change for the Public Good