Joseph Torres

Senior External Affairs Director

Joseph advocates in Washington to ensure that our nation’s media policies serve the public interest and builds coalitions to broaden the media reform movement's base. Joseph writes frequently on media and Internet issues and is the co-author of the New York Times bestseller News for All the People: The Epic Story of Race and the American Media. Joseph also serves on the board of directors of the Center for Media Justice and the National Association of Latino Independent Producers. Before joining Free Press, Joseph worked as deputy director of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists and was a journalist for several years. He earned a degree in communications from the College of Staten Island.

Blog Posts

Recent Press Statements

In the News

  • Telecom Giants Paid Millions to 'Honor' Minority Lawmakers Before the Merger

    Huffington Post
    February 28, 2014

    Comcast and Time Warner Cable are heading into the lobbying stage of their proposed merger with a strong hand. They boast large teams of lobbyists, a history of massive campaign contributions to members of both political parties and close ties to the White House. Over the last several years, the two telecom giants have also contributed millions of dollars to "honor" members of Congress and congressional caucuses. The biggest recipients of this money have been nonprofits linked to minority lawmakers, traditionally some of the most progressive members of Congress.

  • Comcast Foundation's Giving to Minority Groups Likely to Aid Approval of Time Warner Cable Buyout

    Center for Public Integrity
    February 26, 2014

    As Comcast Corp. and Time Warner Cable roll out a massive lobbying effort to win regulatory approval for the merger of the nation’s two largest cable companies, one key step for the companies will be garnering the support of prominent civil rights and minority groups.

  • The Disappearance of Black-Owned TV Stations

    The Tavis Smiley Show
    February 24, 2014

    A recent report from the advocacy group, Free Press, found that there are no Black-owned and operated full-power television stations in the U.S. today. Eight years ago, there were 18—and while that number represented just 1.3 percent of all U.S. TV stations, it was, at least, a presence. Joseph Torres, senior external affairs director for Free Press, joins Tavis Smiley to explain why Black-owned stations have disappeared.

People + Policy

= Positive Change for the Public Good

people + policy = Positive Change for the Public Good