Saving the Internet

The open Internet is central to people’s freedom to communicate, share, advocate and innovate.

But powerful interests want to censor free speech, block the sharing of information, hinder innovation and control how Internet users get online.

All too often, people in power are making decisions behind closed doors about how the Internet should operate.

The result: policies that could close down the open Internet and threaten our freedom to connect and communicate.

It’s time for us to reclaim the Internet. We must declare our Internet freedom.

Blog Posts

  • Jennifer-Johns-Bay-Area-Speaks

    Bay Area Speaks: 'Net Neutrality Is Free Speech'

    November 21, 2014
    On Thursday night, the skies were overcast in San Francisco and threatening to storm. A group of Net Neutrality supporters standing on the steps of San Francisco City Hall adjusted their signs and opened their umbrellas as it began to pour. The group held out, chanting “Fair communication, no discrimination!”
  • surveillance-protest

    The USA Freedom Act: What's Next?

    November 19, 2014
    On Tuesday night the USA Freedom Act failed to move forward. While this bill would have helped rein in key parts of the government’s surveillance programs, not all is lost.
  • Tom-Wheeler-FCC

    What Is Tom Wheeler Waiting For?

    November 19, 2014
    Earlier this month, President Obama added his voice to the nearly 4 million people who have urged the FCC to preserve the open Internet and protect free speech online. Is any of this getting through to Chairman Tom Wheeler?
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Press Releases

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Resources

  • #OaklandVoices: The Facts About Media Inequality in the Bay Area

    The Bay Area is the nation’s sixth-largest television market and fourth-largest radio market. But just a tiny handful of media companies own almost all of the media outlets in this region. Click the link below to learn more.

    January 8, 2014
  • Verizon vs. FCC: Oral Arguments

    On Sept. 9, the D.C. Circuit Court heard oral arguments in Verizon's lawsuit seeking to overturn the Federal Communications Commission's Open Internet Order. If Verizon prevails in this case, the FCC's rules protecting Internet users from corporate abuse will disappear. Click here to hear the full arguments.

    September 19, 2013
  • Letter to President Obama Regarding the Next FCC Chair

    On March 27, 2013, the Free Press Action Fund and a coalition of 27 other organizations sent a letter to President Obama urging him to nominate an FCC chair who will "protect the future of communications for all."

    March 29, 2013
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News from Around the Web

  • Five Regular People Explain Why They Support Net Neutrality

    Daily Dot
    November 21, 2014

    A massive downpour couldn’t prevent around 100 net neutrality supporters from congregating on the steps of San Francisco City Hall on Thursday night for Bay Area Speaks, an event organized by the Electronic Frontier Foundation and Free Press to hear from Bay Area residents and activists about why they support an open Internet.

  • Stern Words for AT&T's Tantrum Over Broadband

    Daily News
    November 20, 2014

    If AT&T can't get its way, it'll just take its toys and go home.

    The company's chief executive, Randall Stephenson, told an investment conference last week that AT&T will stop work on expanding super-fast Internet access nationwide because of President Obama's push for more oversight of broadband networks.

  • How Has President Obama's New Position on Net Neutrality Changed the Debate?

    Your Call
    November 20, 2014

    Your Call features an interview with Free Press President and CEO Craig Aaron and former FCC Commissioner Michael Copps.

Learn More

  • Broadband

    Access to high-speed Internet service — also known as broadband — is a basic public necessity, just like water or electricity.

    Yet despite its importance, broadband access in the United States is far from universal. Millions of Americans still stand on the wrong side of the "digital divide," unable to tap into the political, economic and social resources of the Internet.

  • Cable

    Two decades ago, something unusual happened.

    Consumers were irate about their cable bills, which were increasing at nearly three times the rate of inflation. And Congress actually did something — adopting in overwhelmingly bipartisan fashion the 1992 Cable Act. The law resulted in lower cable bills, saving consumers $3 billion in just over a year’s time.

  • Cybersecurity

    Our right to private communications is a cornerstone of American democracy. But with heightened awareness in the aftermath of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, technological advances have continued allowing the government to expand its reach into our private lives via electronic surveillance and data-mining programs. New laws and policies introduced in the last decade have eroded our civil liberties online.

    Congress has a poor track record when it comes to cybersecurity legislation. The bills introduced so far give the government way too much power to intrude on our privacy online.

People + Policy

= Positive Change for the Public Good

people + policy = Positive Change for the Public Good