Saving the Internet

The open Internet is central to people’s freedom to communicate, share, advocate and innovate.

But powerful interests want to censor free speech, block the sharing of information, hinder innovation and control how Internet users get online.

All too often, people in power are making decisions behind closed doors about how the Internet should operate.

The result: policies that could close down the open Internet and threaten our freedom to connect and communicate.

It’s time for us to reclaim the Internet. We must declare our Internet freedom.

Blog Posts

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Press Releases

  • Free Press: Legally Dubious Hybrid Proposals Won't Protect Internet Users

    October 30, 2014

    WASHINGTON — The Wall Street Journal reported Thursday night that the Federal Communications Commission is redrafting its proposed open Internet rules. The new plan, based on filings from Mozilla and the Center for Democracy and Technology, would reportedly "separate broadband into two distinct services: a retail one, in which consumers would pay broadband providers for Internet access; and a back-end one, in which broadband providers serve as the conduit for websites to distribute content."

  • Despite an FCC No-Show, New Yorkers Speak Out for the Open Internet

    October 28, 2014
    NEW YORK — The fight to save Net Neutrality and stop the Comcast-Time Warner Cable merger came to Brooklyn on Monday night as an enthusiastic crowd of New Yorkers testified before five empty chairs, each representing one of the five FCC commissioners who either declined or failed to respond to the event organizers’ invitations to attend the public hearing in person.
  • TODAY: New York Leaders Join Public Hearing on Net Neutrality and the Comcast Merger

    October 27, 2014
    NEW YORK — The fight to save Net Neutrality and stop the Comcast-Time Warner Cable merger is coming to Brooklyn on Mon., Oct. 27. Rep. Jerrold Nadler, Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer, New York City Mayoral Counsel Maya Wiley and former FCC Commissioner Michael Copps will join others in a public discussion about our rights to connect and communicate. The hearing will occur against the backdrop of two pending FCC decisions that could harm the open Internet.
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Resources

  • #OaklandVoices: The Facts About Media Inequality in the Bay Area

    The Bay Area is the nation’s sixth-largest television market and fourth-largest radio market. But just a tiny handful of media companies own almost all of the media outlets in this region. Click the link below to learn more.

    January 8, 2014
  • Verizon vs. FCC: Oral Arguments

    On Sept. 9, the D.C. Circuit Court heard oral arguments in Verizon's lawsuit seeking to overturn the Federal Communications Commission's Open Internet Order. If Verizon prevails in this case, the FCC's rules protecting Internet users from corporate abuse will disappear. Click here to hear the full arguments.

    September 19, 2013
  • Letter to President Obama Regarding the Next FCC Chair

    On March 27, 2013, the Free Press Action Fund and a coalition of 27 other organizations sent a letter to President Obama urging him to nominate an FCC chair who will "protect the future of communications for all."

    March 29, 2013
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News from Around the Web

  • FCC ‘Net Neutrality’ Plan Calls for More Power Over Broadband

    Wall Street Journal
    October 30, 2014

    WASHINGTON—The head of the Federal Communications Commission is laying the groundwork for expanding the agency’s authority over broadband service, people familiar with his thinking say, a move long sought by advocates of stricter regulation of Internet-service providers.

    But the plan by FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler isn’t expected to satisfy all proponents of “Net Neutrality” — the principle that all Internet traffic should be treated equally — because it would still allow broadband providers to cut deals with content companies for special access to customers.

  • Verizon’s New Tech-News Website Censors Out Net Neutrality, Electronic Spying, Credibility

    Stop the Cap!
    October 30, 2014

    Verizon Wireless’ launch of Sugarstring, a high-budget tech-news website targeting millennial twentysomethings with tech and lifestyle news they can use seemed innocent enough until its editor revealed in a private email Verizon considers reporting on electronic spying and Net Neutrality issues “verboten.”

  • Net Neutrality Hearing 'New York Speaks' Draws Activists, Policy Wonks

    Technical.ly
    October 28, 2014

    Kickstarter and Etsy showed up at a hearing on Net Neutrality at the Brooklyn Public Library’s main branch on Monday night. The hearing was the second part of an event designed to document community support for a free and open Internet. It’s the beginning of a nationwide campaign of similar gatherings, according to Craig Aaron of Free Press.

Learn More

  • Broadband

    Access to high-speed Internet service — also known as broadband — is a basic public necessity, just like water or electricity.

    Yet despite its importance, broadband access in the United States is far from universal. Millions of Americans still stand on the wrong side of the "digital divide," unable to tap into the political, economic and social resources of the Internet.

  • Cable

    Two decades ago, something unusual happened.

    Consumers were irate about their cable bills, which were increasing at nearly three times the rate of inflation. And Congress actually did something — adopting in overwhelmingly bipartisan fashion the 1992 Cable Act. The law resulted in lower cable bills, saving consumers $3 billion in just over a year’s time.

  • Cybersecurity

    Our right to private communications is a cornerstone of American democracy. But with heightened awareness in the aftermath of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, technological advances have continued allowing the government to expand its reach into our private lives via electronic surveillance and data-mining programs. New laws and policies introduced in the last decade have eroded our civil liberties online.

    Congress has a poor track record when it comes to cybersecurity legislation. The bills introduced so far give the government way too much power to intrude on our privacy online.

People + Policy

= Positive Change for the Public Good

people + policy = Positive Change for the Public Good