Saving the Internet

The open Internet is central to people’s freedom to communicate, share, advocate and innovate.

But powerful interests want to censor free speech, block the sharing of information, hinder innovation and control how Internet users get online.

All too often, people in power are making decisions behind closed doors about how the Internet should operate.

The result: policies that could close down the open Internet and threaten our freedom to connect and communicate.

It’s time for us to reclaim the Internet. We must declare our Internet freedom.

Blog Posts

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Press Releases

  • Free Press Builds Definitive Case for Net Neutrality

    July 18, 2014

    Organization’s FCC filing debunks myths about common carriage, skewers the agency’s pay-to-play proposal

    WASHINGTON -- In its filing in the Federal Communications Commission's open Internet proceeding, Free Press provides the definitive argument for protecting Net Neutrality by reclassifying broadband providers as common carriers.

  • Activists Gear Up for Next Phase of Net Neutrality Fight

    July 17, 2014
    WASHINGTON — Several leading grassroots organizations and Web platforms today announced the launch of BattlefortheNet.com, a site serving as a hub of organizing in the Net Neutrality fight.
  • FCC Site Crash Prompts Net Neutrality Supporters to Deliver Comments by Hand

    July 15, 2014
    WASHINGTON — Early Tuesday, the Federal Communications Commission's electronic filing system crashed. In response, Net Neutrality advocates will head to the FCC in person this afternoon to hand-deliver hundreds of thousands of public comments.
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Resources

  • #OaklandVoices: The Facts About Media Inequality in the Bay Area

    The Bay Area is the nation’s sixth-largest television market and fourth-largest radio market. But just a tiny handful of media companies own almost all of the media outlets in this region. Click the link below to learn more.

    January 8, 2014
  • Verizon vs. FCC: Oral Arguments

    On Sept. 9, the D.C. Circuit Court heard oral arguments in Verizon's lawsuit seeking to overturn the Federal Communications Commission's Open Internet Order. If Verizon prevails in this case, the FCC's rules protecting Internet users from corporate abuse will disappear. Click here to hear the full arguments.

    September 19, 2013
  • Letter to President Obama Regarding the Next FCC Chair

    On March 27, 2013, the Free Press Action Fund and a coalition of 27 other organizations sent a letter to President Obama urging him to nominate an FCC chair who will "protect the future of communications for all."

    March 29, 2013
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News from Around the Web

  • Net Neutrality Was Just the Start. Can the FCC Keep States from Banning Public Internet?

    Washington Post
    July 22, 2014

    While everyone's worked up about how to keep the Internet an open platform, another little-known controversy is quickly gaining steam. How it plays out could determine whether millions of Americans get to build their own, local alternatives to big, corporate ISPs such as Comcast and Verizon.

  • Comcast's Worst Nightmare: How Tennessee Could Save America's Internet

    Salon
    July 22, 2014

    Chattanooga's public electric utility offers residents lightning-quick connections -- much to big telecoms' dismay.

  • Net Neutrality, Shall I Compare Thee to a Highway? A Showerhead?

    NPR
    July 22, 2014

    The FCC says it's writing rules for the Internet to preserve the status quo. To quote the FCC website: "The 'Open Internet' is the Internet as we know it." Open, in part, "because it treats all traffic that flows across the network in roughly the same way." Some people fear Internet providers could change the flow by charging more for certain businesses, but it's a complicated issue. And "Net Neutrality" is not a scintillating term, as even the man who coined it admits.

Learn More

  • Broadband

    Access to high-speed Internet service — also known as broadband — is a basic public necessity, just like water or electricity.

    Yet despite its importance, broadband access in the United States is far from universal. Millions of Americans still stand on the wrong side of the "digital divide," unable to tap into the political, economic and social resources of the Internet.

  • Cable

    Two decades ago, something unusual happened.

    Consumers were irate about their cable bills, which were increasing at nearly three times the rate of inflation. And Congress actually did something — adopting in overwhelmingly bipartisan fashion the 1992 Cable Act. The law resulted in lower cable bills, saving consumers $3 billion in just over a year’s time.

  • Cybersecurity

    Our right to private communications is a cornerstone of American democracy. But with heightened awareness in the aftermath of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, technological advances have continued allowing the government to expand its reach into our private lives via electronic surveillance and data-mining programs. New laws and policies introduced in the last decade have eroded our civil liberties online.

    Congress has a poor track record when it comes to cybersecurity legislation. The bills introduced so far give the government way too much power to intrude on our privacy online.

People + Policy

= Positive Change for the Public Good

people + policy = Positive Change for the Public Good