Internet Freedom

The open Internet is central to people’s freedom to communicate, share, advocate and innovate in the 21st century.

But powerful interests want to censor free speech, block the sharing of information, hinder innovation and control how Internet users get online.

All too often, people in power are making political decisions behind closed doors about how the Internet operates, and without the involvement of Internet users themselves.

The result: policies that could close down the open Internet and threaten our freedom to connect.

It’s time for us to reclaim the Internet for its users. We must declare our Internet freedom.

Blog Posts

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Press Releases

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Resources

  • #OaklandVoices: The Facts About Media Inequality in the Bay Area

    The Bay Area is the nation’s sixth-largest television market and fourth-largest radio market. But just a tiny handful of media companies own almost all of the media outlets in this region. Click the link below to learn more.

    January 8, 2014
  • Verizon vs. FCC: Oral Arguments

    On Sept. 9, the D.C. Circuit Court heard oral arguments in Verizon's lawsuit seeking to overturn the Federal Communications Commission's Open Internet Order. If Verizon prevails in this case, the FCC's rules protecting Internet users from corporate abuse will disappear. Click here to hear the full arguments.

    September 19, 2013
  • Letter to President Obama Regarding the Next FCC Chair

    On March 27, 2013, the Free Press Action Fund and a coalition of 27 other organizations sent a letter to President Obama urging him to nominate an FCC chair who will "protect the future of communications for all."

    March 29, 2013
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News from Around the Web

  • Comcast-Time Warner Cable Deal Despised More Than Ever by Consumer Groups, Writers Guild

    The Wrap
    April 11, 2014

    Comcast and Time Warner Cable told federal regulators that their proposed $45 billion merger would mean better service for customers, technological innovation and even more Internet for the poor. Critics didn't see it that way.

  • Facebook, If You're Serious About Privacy Controls, Let Me Control Them

    ReadWrite
    April 11, 2014

    Facebook wants people to stop getting frustrated with the company’s privacy settings. Well, good luck with that.

  • One Billion Hearts, Bleeding as One

    New Republic
    April 11, 2014

    Over the last 5 years, the Web has witnessed a dramatic degree of centralization and standardization. That mostly has made life simpler and easier. With accounts at just, say, Apple, Google, Amazon and Facebook, you can now do almost anything you might like. But convenience, as alluring as it may be, comes with costs that are not always obvious at first. Heartbleed, the vulnerability in SSL encryption discovered yesterday, makes this clear, as did the NSA spying revelations last year.

Learn More

  • Broadband

    Access to high-speed Internet service — also known as broadband — is a basic public necessity, just like water or electricity.

    Yet despite its importance, broadband access in the United States is far from universal. Millions of Americans still stand on the wrong side of the "digital divide," unable to tap into the political, economic and social resources of the Internet.

  • Cable

    Two decades ago, something unusual happened.

    Consumers were irate about their cable bills, which were increasing at nearly three times the rate of inflation. And Congress actually did something — adopting in overwhelmingly bipartisan fashion the 1992 Cable Act. The law resulted in lower cable bills, saving consumers $3 billion in just over a year’s time.

  • Comcast-Time Warner Cable Merger

    On Feb. 13, Comcast announced its bid to buy its chief rival, Time Warner Cable. If approved, this deal would create a television and Internet colossus like no other.

    Comcast is the country’s #1 cable and Internet company and Time Warner Cable is #2. They both regularly rank at the bottom of the barrel in customer-service surveys. Put them together and you get one subpar giant offering service to two-thirds of U.S. homes.

People + Policy

= Positive Change for the Public Good

people + policy = Positive Change for the Public Good